Are Your Employees Ignoring Their 401(k)s?

For many businesses, offering employees a 401(k) plan is no longer an option — it’s a competitive necessity. But employees often grow so accustomed to having a 401(k) that they don’t pay much attention to it.

It’s in your best interest as a business owner to buck this trend. Keeping your employees engaged with their 401(k)s will increase the likelihood that they’ll appreciate this benefit and get the most from it. In turn, they’ll value you more as an employer, which can pay dividends in productivity and retention.

Promote positive awareness

Throughout the year, remind employees that a 401(k) remains one of the most tax-efficient ways to save for retirement. Regardless of investment results, the pretax advantage and any employer match make a 401(k) plan an ideal way to save.

Encourage patience, involvement

The fluctuations and complexities of the stock market may cause some participants to worry about their 401(k)s — or to try not to think about them. Regularly reinforce that their accounts are part of a long-term retirement savings and investment strategy. Explain that both the economy and stock market are cyclical. If employees are invested appropriately for their respective ages, their accounts will likely rebound from most losses.

If a change occurs in the investment environment, such as a sudden drop in the stock market, present it as an opportunity for them to reassess their investment strategy and asset allocation. Market shifts have a significant impact on many individuals’ asset allocations, resulting in portfolios that may be inappropriate for their ages, retirement horizons and risk tolerance. Suggest that employees conduct annual rebalancing to maintain appropriate investment risk.

Offer help

As part of their benefits package, some businesses provide financial counseling services to employees. If you’re one of them, now is a good time to remind them of this resource. Employee assistance programs sometimes offer financial counseling as well.

Another option is to occasionally engage investment advisors to come in and meet with your employees. Your plan vendor may offer this service. Of course, you should never directly give financial advice to employees through anyone who works for your company.

Advocate appreciation

A 401(k) plan is a substantial investment for any company in time, money and resources. Encourage employees to appreciate your efforts — for their benefit and yours. We can help you assess and express the financial advantages of your plan.

The Fine Line Between a Small Business & a Hobby

It’s a matter of work vs. fun, right?  No, the difference – at least from a tax perspective – is that you can fully deduct business expenses from income.  Under the new tax law, you can’t deduct any hobby expenses.

No single factor is determinative, but you’re probably operating a business if:

  •  You have a profit motive.
  • You keep accounting, inventory, and other records.
  • You invest significant time and effort.
  • You need the income you make from it.
  • It’s been profitable for at least three of the past five years (two out of the past seven years for horse-related activities).
  • You’ve conducted similar, profitable activities in the past.
  • You expect assets that you use to appreciate in the future.
  • You consult professional advisers to help improve profitability.

 

Many businesses start as hobbies.  If you want to make the formal transition to a business:

  1. Write a business plan.
  2. Open business banking accounts.
  3. Begin collecting state sales tax (if applicable).
  4. Choose a business entity.
  5. Engage a CPA and other advisers.